Uncategorized

Dutch F1 fans won't repeat 'embarrassing' behaviour, says organisers – Autosport

F1 chiefs have been looking at ramping up security and working with promoters to eradicate the sexual harassment, homophobia and racism from some Dutch fans that was on display at the Red Bull Ring in July.
However, there have been ongoing incidents – with fans having been spotted burning Lewis Hamilton merchandise in Hungary this year.
Ahead of a sell-out 100,000 crowd at Zandvoort this weekend, there will inevitably be a close scrutiny on how Verstappen’s loyal followers behave.
Opinion: F1 must act hard on abuse – no fan should ever attend a GP and not want to go back
But Dutch GP sporting director Jan Lammers says he has absolutely no concerns about the situation – and thinks the small minority who ruined things for many in Austria will probably be too ‘embarrassed’ to return to an F1 event.
Speaking exclusively to Autosport, Lammers said: “I think this year we will prove that Austria was an incident only initiated by some individuals. It was maybe just tens of people that just went a bit over the top: group behaviour and all that.
“So I think those particular fans are already so embarrassed that they might even stay at home, or they’ve been set straight by their friends and family. That was embarrassing. And that’s not how we know the Orange Army.
“During the Olympics and soccer, the Orange fans are usually known for their sense of humour. They don’t take themselves too seriously and make a lot of fun. So I really think that the Orange Army are going to be on their best behaviour.”
Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing waving to the fans
Photo by: Charles Coates / Motorsport Images
At last year’s Dutch GP, despite Hamilton being locked in a tight title fight with Verstappen, there was no evidence of fans taking it too far in how they treated other drivers.
Lammers thinks it will be the same thing this weekend, despite there being many more spectators at the venue.
“I think they’re going to show that what they’re really made of,” he said. “What we saw in Austria, that’s not a real race fan.
“In the past, we’ve had the battle between Lewis and Max and I think we welcome them well here. Anybody booing anybody, particularly with Lewis, if somebody is booing a seven-time world champion, then you have to wonder yourself what you are made of.
“It’s a sporting environment and a sporting family environment, and people should act in a sporting and family way. I often tell it that when our kids go to a party, we tell them, make sure that everybody enjoys it. I think that that focus should be the same here: that everybody makes sure that everybody enjoys it.”
PLUS: How Austrian GP fan behaviour debates overlooked a key point
F1 CEO Stefano Domenicali has also singled out praise for the way that Dutch fans behaved last year, having admitted to some worries beforehand.
“Last year was really for sure an incredible event,” he said. “The energy was tremendous and the respect was tremendous.
“I have to tell you the truth….but there was a little bit of doubt of how the Dutch Orange Army could have responded and welcomed the other drivers.
“But actually it was the other way: it was impressive the way that there was a sporting welcome to everyone: from Lewis to the Ferrari drivers to the other ones. So chapeau.
“This is a sign of maturity: maturity that this society needs to move forward. And this is really something that we can really share.”
Why Verstappen’s absolute F1 domination is no turn off
F1 to extend practice at Japanese, USA GPs for tyre testing
Solution to end fan confusion over F1 grid penalties is ‘pretty simple’
Wolff: No better solution than grid penalties for new F1 engines
The F1 car concept dilemma that Mercedes must answer soon
How a gyro camera became latest F1’s latest TV innovation
Technology never stands still for the Formula 1 teams, and the same goes for the organisation that broadcasts the races around the world.
De Vries confirms Marko talks but F1 future “beyond my control”
Nyck de Vries has confirmed that he is talking to Red Bull advisor Helmut Marko about a possible future with the AlphaTauri Formula 1 team.
The F1 podium-finisher that gave Jordan stability in a year of chaos
The Hart-powered Jordan 194 gave the team hope that the good times were just around the corner. Its 1994 steed wasn’t the start of a move up F1’s pecking order – even if the car did earn the Silverstone team a first pole position. But, as STUART CODLING explains, it did provide a platform for Jordan to become a manufacturer-supported squad
Ferrari: FIA should allow more engines after Monza F1 penalty chaos
Ferrari Formula 1 chief Mattia Binotto believes the FIA needs to consider increasing the power unit allocation per season after almost half the grid took penalties at Monza last weekend.
The F1 podium-finisher that gave Jordan stability in a year of chaos
The Hart-powered Jordan 194 gave the team hope that the good times were just around the corner. Its 1994 steed wasn’t the start of a move up F1’s pecking order – even if the car did earn the Silverstone team a first pole position. But, as STUART CODLING explains, it did provide a platform for Jordan to become a manufacturer-supported squad
How F1’s greatest sound has returned to the track
The first of three new BRM V16s is bringing the greatest-sounding engine to a new audience – and back to the race track – at the Goodwood Revival this weekend. Here is the story of the ambitious 1950 Formula 1 project’s resurrection for historic competition
The juggling act that makes up an F1 team principal’s weekend
Have you ever wondered what a Formula 1 team principal actually does at a grand prix? GP RACING followed Aston Martin team principal Mike Krack to open a window into the TP’s race weekend world…
The F1 car concept dilemma that Mercedes must answer soon
Mercedes is yet to get on top of its troubled W13 Formula 1 car as it gets set to face its first season of the hybrid era without winning either of the titles. As the time comes to switch focus to the 2023 campaign, Mercedes faces a dilemma on whether or not it should stay the course with its current car philosophy or change tact altogether
Why Perez’s new-era F1 promise has deteriorated into disappointment
OPINION: Having earned a two-year extension to his Red Bull Racing contract, Sergio Perez appeared to have cracked the team’s hoodoo over its second seat. But of late the Mexican’s form relative to Max Verstappen has been disappointing, which could put him at risk of losing the race for third in the drivers’ standings to George Russell
The late-race safety car issues F1 still needs to fix to move on from Abu Dhabi
OPINION: Formula 1’s safety car rules were thankfully followed in full at the 2022 Italian Grand Prix, but the situation reignited the controversy of the ending to the 2021 campaign in Abu Dhabi and left neutral fans without a teased grandstand finish. This then, is the perfect time to discuss alternatives to a much-maligned situation
How de Vries’ overdue F1 debut proved him worthy of a 2023 drive
When Alex Albon was taken ill on the Saturday morning of the Italian Grand Prix, Nyck de Vries was thrust into the limelight at Williams as he made a long-overdue grand prix debut. Having been on the cusp of Formula 1 for so long, his stellar run to the points at Monza demonstrated a tantalising prospect for the 2023 grid
Italian Grand Prix Driver Ratings 2022
As Monza celebrated its 100th anniversary, the Temple of Speed witnessed two perfect 10s notched up by a pair of Dutch dynamites at this year’s Formula 1 Italian Grand Prix. But once again there were notable strugglers who would have been hoping for more

source

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

You may also like