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F1 LIVE: Red Bull respond after FIA make budget cap announcement – The Independent

Follow all the reaction after the FIA revealed that Red Bull have not complied with last year’s budget of $145m (£114m)
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Red Bull have been found guilty of a “minor overspend breach” of Formula 1’s cost-cap regulations for 2021 with their punishment yet to be deterimned.
The team spent more than the £114m budget limit but the breach was not over the 5% threshold which would have resulted in a “major breach” category and as such the penalty they incure is not likely to result in Max Verstappen losing the 2021 World Championship. Alongside Red Bull, Aston Martin have also been given a procedural breach.
A statement read: “The FIA Cost Cap Administration is currently determining the appropriate course of action to be taken under the Financial Regulations with respect to Aston Martin and Red Bull and further information will be communicated in compliance with the Regulations.
“Procedural Breaches can result in Financial Penalties and/or Minor Sporting Penalties (in case of aggravating factors) as detailed in the Financial Regulation. Minor Overspend breach (<5% Cost Cap) can result in Financial Penalties and/or Minor Sporting Penalties.”
In response, Red Bull issued a statement in which they said they were “surprised and disappointed” by the findings. Sanctions available to the FIA for a breach range from a reprimand, to financial penalties, to the deduction of drivers’ points, and even exclusion from last year’s championship, won by Verstappen in thrilling fashion against Lewis Hamilton.
Monday’s announcement from the FIA found that Red Bull were the only team to go over the budget cap in the 2021 season – the same year Max Verstappen controversially won the driver’s championship.
The sport’s governing body found that Mercedes, Ferrari, McLaren, Alpine, AlphaTauri, Alfa Romeo, Williams and Haas had all complied with the rule, Aston Martin were guilty of a procedural breach whilst Red Bull breached the procedural and minor overspend limits.
Red Bull now face a penalty – still to be determined by the FIA and have the option to appeal against the findings. This is what could happen to the team:
Minor breach = overspend of less than 5%. Penalties could be:
– Deduction of Drivers’ and Constructors’ Championship points
– Suspension form one of more stages of a competition
– Limitations on ability to conduct aerodynamic or other testing
– Reduction of the cost cap
Max Verstappen beat Lewis Hamilton to the 2021 Drivers Championship by eight points
Martin Brundle insists F1’s budget cap rules need “tightening up” in the wake of Red Bull’s “minor financial breach” as revealed on Monday.
Red Bull, who have won last year’s and this year’s Drivers Championship with Max Verstappen, say they’re “surprised and disappointed” after the FIA found they were guilty of an overspend of the 2021 cost cap.
Their punishment is yet to be determined, with the options ranging from a fine to points deductions. Aston Martin were also found guilty of a procedural breach, as were Red Bull. Yet Sky Sports pundit and ex-F1 driver Brundle believes the 5% overspend margin – when a breach goes from minor to major – is still too much and the rules need to be “rigid.”
“What seems crazy to me is that a minor breach can be up to 5% overspend on the cost cap at 7 million,” he said on Sky’s Any Driven Monday show.
“We know that’s a massive upgrade on a car, maybe even a B-spec for some teams. So that needs tightening up for starters, because what’s the point in having 140 million, whatever the number ends up being, and then having this five percent variance?
“So I’m assuming that the FIA will have to crack down hard on any minor breaches, but it looks like it could be a reprimand or a fine, will they want to revisit points, will it be manufacturers points or drivers points for 2021?”
Red Bull were found guilty of a ‘minor financial breach’ but Brundle says the 5% overspend margin is too high
The FIA also confirmed that Aston Martin “is considered to be in procedural breach of the financial regulations,” with Red Bull also in “procedural breach.” Williams had previously been found in “procedural breach”, which has since been remediated – the team paid a $25,000 fine
An FIA statement read: “The FIA Cost Cap Administration is currently determining the appropriate course of action to be taken under the Financial Regulations with respect to Aston Martin and Red Bull and further information will be communicated in compliance with the Regulations.
“Procedural Breaches can result in Financial Penalties and/or Minor Sporting Penalties (in case of aggravating factors) as detailed in the Financial Regulation. Minor Overspend breach (<5% Cost Cap) can result in Financial Penalties and/or Minor Sporting Penalties.”
The FIA statement continued: “The review of the Reporting Documentation submitted has been an intensive and thorough process, and all Competitors gave their full support in providing the required information to assess their financial situation during this first year of the Financial Regulations.
“The FIA Cost Cap Administration notes that all Competitors acted at all times in a spirit of good faith and cooperation throughout the process.”
One day, Max Verstappen might just win a world title in routine Formula 1 fashion: he finishes the race and passes the point of no return. And it’d be accurate to ascertain that, judging by his utter dominance this year, that time will come. Yet the procession that was his 2022 championship triumph concluded in a manner that was as intoxicating as it was infuriating – for all involved.
While Verstappen’s thrillingly controversial last-lap overtake in Abu Dhabi sealed a maiden title which was followed by question marks and, ultimately, verification, this year’s worked contrariwise at the end of a sodden, chaotic and plot-holed Japanese Grand Prix. Come the chequered flag, and even the post-race interview, the Red Bull man believed he would have to wait two weeks for his crowning moment in Austin.
Yet as news filtered in, Verstappen was indeed victor ludorum. Charles Leclerc – needing to finish second – had been given a five-second penalty after going off-track at the final chicane and gaining an advantage as he stayed ahead of Sergio Perez, gifting the prize to a disbelieving Dutchman.
However, anarchy reigned still: did this shortened 28-lap race fill the quota for full points? “Are you sure?” asked a confused Verstappen. But as the light of day turned in an instant to the dead of night, FIA confirmation allowed Red Bull to bask in their 14th victory – Verstappen’s 12th – of a season which Christian Horner described as “beyond all our dreams”.
Verstappen’s win and title-clinching moment at Suzuka was shrouded in confusion on a day of mayhem where the main event could have been of a tragic nature
Mattia Binotto, team principal at Ferrari, fears that Formula 1’s “credibility is at stake” with the budget cap row. Red Bull were found to have overspent in Monday’s FIA findings with their punishment yet to be determined.
The sport’s financial regulations define a minor breach as one less than 5% of the cap, set at $145m (£114m) in 2021, and a material one as more than that. But Binotto is certain that even a minor breach should be taken seriously.
“It’s definitely a shame that we are talking about it in October of the following season, because at this point, apart from implications on last year’s championship, there are also implications for the current one,” the Ferrari team principal told Sky Italia.
“Let’s wait until Wednesday before making a judgement but, whatever amount we are talking about, it’s important to understand that even if it is four million, which falls into the category of what is considered a minor breach, four million is not minor.”
The FIA will issue certificates of budget cap compliance on Wednesday 5 October
Christian Horner said he was “very confident” in Red Bull’s submission – as the team celebrated Verstappen’s second world title following a bizarre end to a dramatic Japanese Grand Prix on Sunday – before the FIA’s findings on Monday.
“We’ve been shocked at the speculation and accusations that have been made by other teams.,” Horner told BBC Radio 4. “We wait for the FIA to conclude their process and we wait to see what comes out. Anything other than compliance we’ll be extremely surprised at.”
Sanctions available to the FIA for a breach ranged from a reprimand, to financial penalties, to the deduction of drivers’ points, and even exclusion from the championship.
Red Bull added in their statement after the results were published: “We need to carefully review the FIA’s findings as our belief remains that the relevant costs are under the 2021 cost cap amount.
“Despite the conjecture and positioning of others, there is of course a process under the regulations with the FIA which we will respectfully follow while we consider all the options available to us.”
Red Bull have been found guilty of a “minor overspend breach” of F1’s cost-cap regulations for 2021 with their punishment yet to be determined – though a fine is the most likely outcome.
The team spent more than the £114m cost cap but with the breach not over the 5% “major breach” threshold of £5.7m, the penalty is not likely to result in Max Verstappen losing last year’s World Championship due to a loss of 2021 points.
Red Bull said in a statement that they are “surprised and disappointed” with the findings, insisting that there “2021 submission was below the cost cap limit.”
The FIA also confirmed that Aston Martin “is considered to be in procedural breach of the financial regulations,” with Red Bull also in “procedural breach.” Williams had previously been found in “procedural breach”, which has since been remediated – the team paid a $25,000 fine
An FIA statement read: “The FIA Cost Cap Administration is currently determining the appropriate course of action to be taken under the Financial Regulations with respect to Aston Martin and Red Bull and further information will be communicated in compliance with the Regulations.”
The FIA revealed that Red Bull have not complied with last year’s budget of $145million (£114m)
Lando Norris has added his name to a growing list of Formula One drivers calling for a “hefty penalty” for teams who break the budget cap – claiming they would benefit for years to come from any infringement.
The sport’s governing body, the FIA, has delayed its findings into whether any of the grid’s teams have broken the financial rules until Monday. It was anticipated that the FIA would reveal on Wednesday those that failed to comply with last season’s £114million cap.
Red Bull faced unproven allegations at the Singapore Grand Prix that they exceeded F1’s costs cap last term – bringing into the spotlight the legitimacy of Max Verstappen’s already controversial championship win over Lewis Hamilton.
With the decision now being delayed, Norris believes it will hang over the Japanese Grand Prix and, when asked if punishment needed to be swift and severe, the McLaren driver replied: “Of course.
“I think because teams are trying to find and trying to be as efficient as possible with every single thing that they do, any small amount over is, in any part of Formula One, maybe not huge, but depending on what it is, a big advantage.”
Red Bull are one of the teams that could be punished if they are found to have breached the rules
Lewis Hamilton believes the integrity of Formula 1 would be damaged if a team were found to have broken the budget cap – insisting it is “imperative” that any breach is suitably punished.
Red Bull were found to have overspent in Monday’s FIA findings with their punishment yet to be determined. The situation will now progress with Hamilton keen for any wrongdoing to be correctly punished.
“I think it’s imperative, honestly, just for transparency,” the seven-time world champion said in Suzuka.
“I think we need to continue to have transparency for the fans, for the integrity of the sport. I don’t really know enough about it. I know obviously there’s lots of conversations that are going on in the background. No one truly knows.”
“There’s different numbers and different things being said here and there, so I was expecting those results to come out yesterday.
“I would like to think that if it’s been delayed it’s because it’s been taken very seriously and I trust that Mohammed [bin Sulayem, FIA president] is taking it seriously and will do what is right for the sport, I hope. I think it would be bad for the sport if action wasn’t taken if there was a breach, but I don’t know if there is so I’ll wait.”
The FIA has delayed its findings into whether any of the grid’s teams have broken the financial rules
Red Bull team principal Christian Horner expects a change to the rules on awarding full points in races that have not gone the distance after Max Verstappen was crowned world champion in confusing circumstances following Sunday’s Japanese Grand Prix.
Verstappen took the chequered flag at a rain-soaked Suzuka, with Red Bull teammate Sergio Perez promoted to second after Ferarri’s Charles Leclerc was handed a five-second penalty for leaving the track and gaining an advantage on the final lap.
However, because the race had ended when the time limit expired and not when the full number of laps had been completed, confusion reigned as to how many points would be awarded.
The majority of the pit lane, including Verstappen and Red Bull, believed half-points would be given as the race had not passed 75 per cent distance – but the regulations state that, as the grand prix had been resumed following a delay of over two hours due to rain, full points would be given.
That left Verstappen with a second world championship – even if Horner did not know it at the time – and the team principal now believes the rules, introduced following farcical scenes at last year’s Belgian Grand Prix, will once again be looked at.
I’m certain it will be,” he said when asked if teams would speak to the FIA, F1’s governing body, to revise the regulation.
“We were confused and we thought it would not have been the full awards (of points). So initially, our calculations were such that he was not world champion.
“I think it’s a mistake that wasn’t included after the issues in Spa last year, that the regulations obviously haven’t been mopped up.
“We were under the strong impression that only with 75 per cent of the race, full points will be scored. So we felt we were going to be one point short.
The majority of the pit lane, including Verstappen and Red Bull, believed half-points would be given
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