Uncategorized

Why McLaren has abandoned its original sidepod concept – Motorsport.com

As part of a revised package of parts introduced for the French Grand Prix, McLaren has moved much closer to the direction seen on the lead pairing of Red Bull and Ferrari.
Prior to the French Grand Prix, McLaren had been somewhere in the middle ground of teams in this area.
Aston Martin was originally at one extreme opting for the high waisted sidepod solution, whilst Williams and Mercedes had gone (initially at least) for a very short, quickly tapering arrangement.
Having seen Aston Martin and Williams already turn their backs on their respective concepts, McLaren has become the latest to do so too.
It now leaves just Mercedes to soldier on with its more compact sidepod design.
The design concept that McLaren had initially followed (top, main image) is something that teams had pursued with gusto under the previous era of regulations.
Designers had aimed to narrow the bodywork around the car’s centreline and expose as much of the top surface of the floor as possible.
This was made viable by the aerodynamic tools at the designers’ disposal when it came to managing the front tyre wake. The front wing furniture, the flow through brake duct and wheel rim designs plus the bargeboards, with their associated furniture, all helped to create outwash.
Most of these tools have been taken away from the designer’s arsenal now and, whilst teams are all still finding ways to improve their weaponry, they can’t recover all of that performance.
Daniel Ricciardo, McLaren MCL36
Photo by: Zak Mauger / Motorsport Images
On top of this, the way the floor works in 2022 is very different, with much more focus on the design of the underfloor tunnels that feed the diffuser. The floor’s stiffness, the car’s ride height and its rake angle have also dramatically been altered.
This has led to the bulk of the grid opting for a more benign solution and offsetting their desire for tighter bodywork and a direct performance boost. Instead, they want a selection of surfaces that can act as a buffer to realign the wake along the flank of the car, rather than trying to displace it at the front of the floor and sidepods.
The sidepod designs utilised by the bulk of the grid therefore look to mitigate some of the issues posed by the tyre wake being shed from the front tyre by extending the sidepod’s length, and thus creating a divisional barrier to the airflow passing over the top of the sidepod.
This primarily results in a downwashing ramp being used, with the airflow invited to follow the contours into the coke bottle region at the rear of the car.
As part of this design scheme, the upper surface of the sidepod can then also be fitted with cooling gills, which returned as part of the regulatory overhaul this season and allows heat generated within the sidepod an escape route.
This can also lead to the rear cooling outlet being smaller than might be the case with other solutions, which may lead to further aerodynamic gains.
McLaren MLC36 floor
Photo by: Giorgio Piola
In McLaren’s case it has also opted to sneak its cooling gills up around the high waisted engine cover’s shoulder, in much the same way that we’ve seen Red Bull, Aston Martin, Haas and Ferrari do.
Alterations have also been made to the floor fences and the underfloor strake system, whilst the floor’s edge has been modified, as the team looks to better influence the wake generated by the front tyre by pushing it away from the car.
Further downstream you might note that the diffuser kickline and upwards ramp thereafter has also changed quite significantly. The floor stay is also much shorter being connected to the sidepod ramp now, rather than reaching all the way across to the engine cover.
A number of reliability fixes have arrived as part of this package too, including the rear wing endplate being trimmed following a reliability concern that had been raised in recent races.
Meanwhile, given the heat, McLaren has also introduced some optimisations in regards to the rear brake cooling, with revisions made to the internal ducting to help channel the airflow around the assembly more effectively.
Hamilton: Win is “going to be a while” if France F1 form continues
2022 F1 French Grand Prix – How to watch, start time & more
How Red Bull piled back the downforce in Hungary
Why Haas update was more shrewd than just a Ferrari copy
The old and new F1 ideas that Mercedes has brought to the Hungarian GP
Singapore F1 track to be playable map in new Call of Duty game
The Marina Bay circuit, host of the Formula 1 Singapore Grand Prix, will be a playable map in the next Call of Duty game, developers Infinity Ward have announced.
The reasons behind Ricciardo’s McLaren Formula 1 struggles
Daniel Ricciardo’s pending Formula 1 exit from McLaren is set to end two difficult years for the eight-time grand prix winner.
How studying Schumacher helped make Coulthard a McLaren F1 mainstay
Winner of 13 grands prix including Monaco and survivor of a life-changing plane crash, David Coulthard could be forgiven for having eased into a quiet retirement – but, as MARK GALLAGHER explains, in fact he’s busier than ever, running an award-winning media company and championing diversity in motor racing. Not bad for someone who, by his own admission, wasn’t quite the fastest driver of his generation…
How Red Bull piled back the downforce in Hungary
Red Bull initially feared it would be on the back foot at Formula 1’s Hungarian Grand Prix, with the team seemingly less comfortable at high downforce circuits than previous years.
How studying Schumacher helped make Coulthard a McLaren F1 mainstay
Winner of 13 grands prix including Monaco and survivor of a life-changing plane crash, David Coulthard could be forgiven for having eased into a quiet retirement – but, as MARK GALLAGHER explains, in fact he’s busier than ever, running an award-winning media company and championing diversity in motor racing. Not bad for someone who, by his own admission, wasn’t quite the fastest driver of his generation…
Could F1 move to a future beyond carbon fibre?
Formula 1 has ambitious goals for improving its carbon footprint, but could this include banishing its favoured composite material? Pat Symonds considers the alternatives to carbon fibre and what use, if any, those materials have in a Formula 1 setting
The traits that fuelled Alonso’s unexpected Aston Martin F1 move
Fernando Alonso’s bombshell switch to Aston Martin sent shockwaves through Formula 1, not least at Alpine that finds itself tangled in a contract standoff with Oscar Piastri. Not shy of a bold career move and with a CV punctuated by them, there were numerous hints that trouble was brewing.
The elements Ferrari must resolve to first save face, then win championships
OPINION: Ferrari’s Formula 1 title hopes look all but over after another strategic blunder in last week’s Hungarian Grand Prix denied Charles Leclerc the chance to fight for victory, while handing it to chief rival Max Verstappen. The Scuderia now faces intense scrutiny over what it must now do to finally become a genuine factor in championship battles
The clues about Hamilton’s F1 retirement plans after Vettel decision
OPINION: Sebastian Vettel is set to leave Formula 1 at the end of 2022 and will, rather shockingly, be replaced by Fernando Alonso at Aston Martin. But what about the final chapter of the other driver that defined the post-Michael Schumacher era? In Hungary, Lewis Hamilton spoke about his future in the context of Vettel’s upcoming departure, which offered clues on how long it will last.
Why all signs point to F1’s Monaco special relationship continuing
OPINION: With more potential venues than there are slots in future calendars, rumours have been circulating that the Monaco Grand Prix could be a casualty of F1’s expansion into new markets. But Mark Gallagher thinks this is highly unlikely.
Hungarian Grand Prix Driver Ratings 2022
The Hungarian Grand Prix race result, after a dry race held without safety car conditions, bore little resemblance to what was anticipated after qualifying. While certain drivers were nullified by some iffy strategy calls, others shone to grasp opportunities afforded to them in the last F1 race before the summer break
Why Ferrari had the strategy shocker that helped Verstappen win
After Max Verstappen’s difficult qualifying left him 10th on the grid for the Hungarian Grand Prix, few expected him to take an eighth victory of the 2022 Formula 1 season. Yet that’s precisely what happened as Ferrari converted second and third on the grid into fourth and sixth at the flag with a bungled strategy that cost Charles Leclerc yet more ground in the title race.

source

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

You may also like